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What COVID-19 measures are in place to protect me?
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Comprehensive sanitation procedures:
All staff follow a strict hand washing protocol and hand sanitisers are available to all patients. Our staff is also rigorous in regular sterilisation of treatment rooms, equipment and high-touch surfaces such as reception surfaces, door handles, and treatment areas in between all patient interactions.

Temperature taking of all patients and staff:
We take every staff member’s temperature at the start of every day and every patient’s temperature upon check-in at reception counter using a non-contact thermometer. If the reading is 38 degrees or higher and flu-like symptoms are displayed, the person will not be permitted into the centre (patients to be rescheduled with no fee charged).

Easy appointment cancellation and rescheduling:
All patients who have recently travelled to high-risk areas as defined by the Australian government or those who are feeling unwell and show flu-like symptoms such as headache, cough or fever, are asked to reschedule their appointment. No cancellation fee will apply and we will reschedule the appointment in the most timely manner.

Established medical response team:
Our Clinical Advisory Board team and Medical Director, Professor David Wilkinson, who is also an experienced Epidemiologist, provide guidance and daily updates to our centres and can assist with specific situations as required.

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Do I need to book an appointment?
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Yes, appointments are necessary to maintain a good workflow at the Centre and to ensure you are not kept waiting but can see the doctor at the appointed time.

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Do I need a referral from my GP?
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No, you do not need a referral. However, if your GP has referred you to us, they will give you a letter to bring to your appointment.

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What do I need to bring?
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Please bring a valid Medicare card and pension card (if you have one) to each consultation. If it is your first visit, please bring any documentation relating to your skin cancer history.

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What do I wear?
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It is important to wear loose, comfortable clothing and slip-on shoes (not lace-up shoes). This helps to reduce the time you spend getting undressed so that you have more time with the doctor.

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How long does a skin check take?
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A skin check can take between 15 and 30 minutes, depending on your skin type and the number of moles you have. Make sure you tell the doctor about any spots or moles which are sore, changing, abnormal or new.

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How is the skin check performed?
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The doctor will ask you to undress down to your underwear. You can ask for a modesty sheet if you wish. The doctor will use a dermatoscope to visually inspect your whole body. A dermatoscope is a special skin microscope which allows the doctor to look through your skin. The procedure is completely painless. If you have an area of concern beneath your underwear, please let the doctor know.

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What happens if the doctor finds a suspicious skin spot?
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The doctor will tell you straight away if you have any moles or spots which require a biopsy, which means that a small sample of skin is removed for further testing. After it has been removed, the sample is sent to a pathology laboratory for diagnosis. Receiving the test results can take up to several days. The results and treatment options will be discussed with you at length at your follow-up appointment.

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Why do I need a biopsy? Why can’t I just have my procedure?
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It is important that you have a biopsy, as the results of this procedure will influence the best course of action.

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What happens if skin cancer is found?
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In most cases, when found early, skin cancer can be easily and successfully treated with surgery. Most skin cancers are cured once they are removed. Other non-surgical treatments may be used but this will depend on the type of skin cancer found.

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Why are procedures not performed at the same time as the skin check?
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Skin checks and procedures are not performed at the same time to minimise the risk of infection and help reduce your waiting time.

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What is a SCC and BCC and how do they differ?
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A SCC is a squamous cell carcinoma – a dangerous cancer that must be removed. It can present as a thickened red scaly spot which may bleed or ulcerate easily. It usually appears on sites most often exposed to the sun and will grow over some months. A BCC is a basal cell carcinoma – the most common and least dangerous type of cancer. It appears as a lump or scaling area which can be red, pale or pearly in colour. As it grows, it may become ulcerated like a sore that won’t heal. BCCs grow slowly and usually appear on the head, neck or upper body.

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Do I have to come back for my results?
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Yes, it is important that you come back to discuss your pathology results with the doctor and determine the best course of action.

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Do you bulk bill?
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We are private billing facilities and we appreciate full payment on the day of consultation. We are dedicated to providing the best standard of patient care without compromise. Our highly qualified doctors will address your skin health needs promptly and efficiently, and our specially trained support staff will minimise waiting times and ensure your experience is as pleasant as possible.

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How often should I get a skin check?
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Depending on your level of risk for developing skin cancer, your doctor may recommend regular follow-up skin checks. The frequency for follow-up skin checks can vary from every few months, to once every year or two. We will send you regular skin check reminders, but it is also a good idea to keep your own record of when a follow-up skin check is due.

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Are the doctors GPs or specialists?
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Our doctors are general practitioners with special qualifications in skin cancer medicine. All have completed university-certified skin cancer training and have many years’ experience in the detection and surgical removal of skin cancers. Some of our doctors also present and train other GPs in the detection and surgical removal of skin cancers through university-certified skin cancer courses for GPs.

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How much do your services cost?
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The National Skin Cancer Centres are private billing facilities. We offer several payment options, including cash, EFTPOS and credit card. For your convenience, we use Medicare online so your rebate will be refunded promptly. Costs for consultations, skin checks and procedures differ between locations. While veterans are fully bulk billed, patients will fall into one of two categories, "Concession" and "Private". Kindly refer to the pricing policy on the individual clinic page or contact us via phone for more information.

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Do you deliver skin cancer education in my community?
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Patient education is very important to us, and we strive to educate the community on skin cancer prevention and early detection. If you would like us to come to your club, school, business or community and deliver a free information session, please send your request to info@skincancercentres.com.au. We look forward to hearing from you.

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Do you offer any services besides skin cancer management?
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Our centres are dedicated skin cancer facilities specialising in skin cancer diagnosis and treatment, and our highly trained staff provide unparalleled care in this field. We also offer skin repair and rejuvenation treatments in some of the locations. Delivered by fully qualified aesthetic physicians, the treatments include dermal fillers, anti-wrinkle injections, microdermabrasion, photodynamic light therapy, LED therapy, micro-needling, chemical peels, and cosmetic mole removal. Please refer to the individual clinic pages to learn more.

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What is the difference between getting your skin check with a Skin Cancer Doctor, GP or dermatologist?
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The daily practice of a Skin Cancer Doctor is dedicated exclusively to detecting and treating skin cancers. Skin cancer medicine is the subspeciality in which they are specially qualified and experienced, and their skin cancer clinics are set up specifically for timely and effective skin cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment all under one roof, including operating theatres and state-of-the-art technology geared towards finding and/or monitoring all types of skin cancer.

Dermatologists are general skin specialists with wait lists up to one year; since early detection of skin cancer is critical to successful treatment and cure, this lengthy wait time can significantly worsen your prognosis. This can also be an expensive option and you will require a referral to see a specialist.

GPs may sometimes lack the sub-specialist training to diagnose skin cancer or they may be able to perform a basic skin check but you may be referred to another doctor for treatment. A GP may only have the time or skills to perform a spot check rather than the recommended full-body skin examination.

You can learn more in this blog post.

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