"Don't put it off": Deborah Hutton's skin cancer story

As an established authority in skin cancer medicine in Australia, one of our expert Skin Cancer Doctors was recently approached by 7News to shed light on “Australia’s national cancer”.

Two years ago, model, magazine editor and TV reporter Deborah Hutton had surgery to remove skin cancer from her face. Now aged 60, she is sharing her skin cancer journey to help others and remind people of the importance of sun safety and regular skin checks.

“Out of everything I’ve done or accomplished, this is the most meaningful thing I have ever done with my life,” Deborah says in the TV documentary, which aired on Channel 7 on 15 May.

Watch the highlights here:

 

Deborah had two basal cell carcinomas removed from her face and is at high risk for skin cancers again in the future.

"It will happen again - I’m not out of the woods. That area of the face is a freeway for skin cancer.”

She has spent the past few months travelling around the nation with 7News speaking to experts including National Skin Cancer Centres' own Dr Helena Rosengren about the disease that affects two in three Australians.

It was not the first time Deborah has had skin cancer, and now she has her skin checked every three months.

“After having the stitches out from another major surgery to remove two skin cancers, and being extremely grateful they’ve got it all, I feel it’s only right to remind you to get your skin checked!” she said in an Instagram post.

"Please. Early detection is everything! Don’t delay. To look at the area around my nose prior to surgery, nothing was visible to the naked eye.”

The face, head and neck are more susceptible to sin cancer, and Deborah explains having checks “is more important than vanity”.

“The fear shouldn’t be the scar that might be left, the fear should be not getting to it in time,” she says.

“Your face will heal. We cannot treat the sun as our mate.”

Her message is clear: find a doctor you trust, have your skin checked regularly and don’t put it off.

Written by National Skin Cancer Centres